IPTables Information


IPTables
iptables is a user-space application program that allows a system administrator to configure the tables provided by the Linux kernel firewall (implemented as different Netfilter modules) and the chains and rules it stores. Different kernel modules and programs are currently used for different protocols; iptables applies to IPv4, ip6tables to IPv6, arptables to ARP, and ebtables to Ethernet frames.

iptables requires elevated privileges to operate and must be executed by user root, otherwise it fails to function. On most Linux systems, iptables is installed as /usr/sbin/iptables and documented in its man pages, which can be opened using man iptables when installed. It may also be found in /sbin/iptables, but since iptables is more like a service rather than an “essential binary”, the preferred location remains /usr/sbin.

The term iptables is also commonly used to inclusively refer to the kernel-level components. x_tables is the name of the kernel module carrying the shared code portion used by all four modules that also provides the API used for extensions; subsequently, Xtables is more or less used to refer to the entire firewall (v4, v6, arp, and eb) architecture.

Netfilter-packet-flow.svg

Overview
The origin of the packet determines which chain it traverses initially. There are five predefined chains (mapping to the five available Netfilter hooks), though a table may not have all chains. Predefined chains have a policy, for example DROP, which is applied to the packet if it reaches the end of the chain. The system administrator can create as many other chains as desired. These chains have no policy; if a packet reaches the end of the chain it is returned to the chain which called it. A chain may be empty.
PREROUTING
Packets will enter this chain before a routing decision is made.
INPUT
Packet is going to be locally delivered. It does not have anything to do with processes having an opened socket; local delivery is controlled by the “local-delivery” Routing Table
ip route show table local.
FORWARD
All packets that have been routed and were not for local delivery will traverse this chain.
OUTPUT
Packets sent from the machine itself will be visiting this chain.
POSTROUTING
Routing decision has been made. Packets enter this chain just before handing them off to the hardware.

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